The Black Butterfly

The Black Butterfly PDF
Author: Lawrence T. Brown
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 384
View: 564

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Persuasively arguing that because urban apartheid was intentionally erected it can be intentionally dismantled, The Black Butterfly demonstrates that America cannot reflect that Black lives matter until we see how Black neighborhoods matter.


Baltimore Revisited

Baltimore Revisited PDF
Author: P. Nicole King
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 320
View: 4104

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Book Description:
Nicknamed both “Mobtown” and “Charm City” and located on the border of the North and South, Baltimore is a city of contradictions. From media depictions in The Wire to the real-life trial of police officers for the murder of Freddie Gray, Baltimore has become a quintessential example of a struggling American city. Yet the truth about Baltimore is far more complicated—and more fascinating. To help untangle these apparent paradoxes, the editors of Baltimore Revisited have assembled a collection of over thirty experts from inside and outside academia. Together, they reveal that Baltimore has been ground zero for a slew of neoliberal policies, a place where inequality has increased as corporate interests have eagerly privatized public goods and services to maximize profits. But they also uncover how community members resist and reveal a long tradition of Baltimoreans who have fought for social justice. The essays in this collection take readers on a tour through the city’s diverse neighborhoods, from the Lumbee Indian community in East Baltimore to the crusade for environmental justice in South Baltimore. Baltimore Revisited examines the city’s past, reflects upon the city’s present, and envisions the city’s future.


Black Baltimore 1820 1870

Black Baltimore  1820 1870 PDF
Author: Ralph Clayton
Publisher:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 199
View: 2903

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The Effect of Immigration on the Negro in Baltimore 1850-1860 describes the effects of predominantly non-Black immigration into the city on the lives of the free and slave Blacks before the Civil War. Slaveholders of Baltimore, 1860 discusses the social history of the slaves, and provides a listing of all slaveholders enumerated in the 1860 Federal Census. Slaves by Name. Notices of runaway slaves were routinely published in the newspapers and now provide an important resource for family historians. This article provides an index to such notices in the Baltimore Sun for the years 1837-1864. Baltimore Free Black Households with Slaves, 1820-1840. In a city like Baltimore not all slaves were required to live on the premises of their master, and they frequently appear in the households of other Blacks who often were friends or relations. In addition, a surprising number of free Blacks were themselves slave holders. Black Families of East Baltimore, 1870. This first census after Emancipation is the first to identify all Blacks by name, age, birthplace, etc. and is of great value to family historians and sociologists. This article provides a listing of every Black in Wards 1 to 6 of East Baltimore. Laurel Cemetery, 1852-1958 gives a brief history of the cemetery and a partial reconstruction of interments there.


Bearing Witness While Black

Bearing Witness While Black PDF
Author: Allissa V. Richardson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 304
View: 7001

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Book Description:
"Bearing Witness While Black: African Americans, Smartphones and the New Protest #Journalism tells the story of this century's most powerful Black social movement--through the eyes of 15 activists who documented it. At the height of the Black Lives Matter uprisings, African Americans filmed and tweeted evidence of fatal police encounters in dozens of US cities--using little more than the device in their pockets. Their urgent dispatches from the frontlines spurred a global debate on excessive police force, which claimed the lives of African American men, women and children at disproportionate rates. This groundbreaking book reveals how the perfect storm of smartphones, social media and social justice empowered Black activists to create their own news outlets, which continued a centuries-long, African American tradition of using the news to challenge racism. Bearing Witness While Black is the first book of its kind to identify three overlapping eras of domestic terror against African American people--slavery, lynching and police brutality--and explain how storytellers during each period documented its atrocities through journalism. What results is a stunning genealogy--of how the slave narratives of the 1700s inspired the Abolitionist movement; how the black newspapers of the 1800s galvanized the anti-lynching and Civil Rights movements; and how the smartphones of today have powered the anti-police brutality movement. This lineage of black witnessing, Allissa V. Richardson teaches us, is formidable and forever evolving. Richardson's own activism, as an award-winning pioneer of smartphone journalism, informs this text deeply. She weaves in personal accounts of her teaching in the US and Africa--and of her own brushes with police brutality--to share how she has inspired black youth to use mobile devices, to speak up from the margins. It is from this vantage point, as participant-observer, that she urges us not to become numb to the tragic imagery that African Americans have documented. Instead, Bearing Witness While Black conveys a crucial need to protect our right to look--into the forbidden space of violence against black bodies--and to continue to regard the smartphone as an instrument of moral suasion and social change"--


Hands Up Don T Shoot

Hands Up  Don   t Shoot PDF
Author: Jennifer E. Cobbina
Publisher: NYU Press
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 288
View: 7341

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Book Description:
Understanding the explosive protests over police killings and the legacy of racism Following the high-profile deaths of eighteen-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and twenty-five-year-old Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, both cities erupted in protest over the unjustified homicides of unarmed black males at the hands of police officers. These local tragedies—and the protests surrounding them—assumed national significance, igniting fierce debate about the fairness and efficacy of the American criminal justice system. Yet, outside the gaze of mainstream attention, how do local residents and protestors in Ferguson and Baltimore understand their own experiences with race, place, and policing? In Hands Up, Don’t Shoot, Jennifer Cobbina draws on in-depth interviews with nearly two hundred residents of Ferguson and Baltimore, conducted within two months of the deaths of Brown and Gray. She examines how protestors in both cities understood their experiences with the police, how those experiences influenced their perceptions of policing, what galvanized Black Lives Matter as a social movement, and how policing tactics during demonstrations influenced subsequent mobilization decisions among protesters. Ultimately, she humanizes people’s deep and abiding anger, underscoring how a movement emerged to denounce both racial biases by police and the broader economic and social system that has stacked the deck against young black civilians. Hands Up, Don’t Shoot is a remarkably current, on-the-ground assessment of the powerful, protestor-driven movement around race, justice, and policing in America.


Herd Register

Herd register PDF
Author:
Publisher:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 560

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