Reading Race In American Poetry

Reading Race in American Poetry PDF
Author: Aldon Lynn Nielsen
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 232
View: 3999

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Book Description:
Here, inter-racial poets and critics join together to analyze the role that race plays in the reading and writing of American poetry, and the role that poetry plays in our understanding of race.


Reading Race

Reading Race PDF
Author: Aldon Lynn Nielsen
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 178
View: 3256

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Book Description:
Reading Race examines the work of twentieth-century white American poets from Carl Sandburg to Adrienne Rich, from Ezra Pound to Allen Ginsberg, revealing within their poetry and casual writings a body of literature that transmits racism, even as it sometimes speaks against it. Tracing the persistence of racial discourse, Aldon Nielsen argues that white Americans, throughout their history, have used a language of their own primacy, a language that treats blacks as an abstract other--an aggregate nonwhite--to be acted upon and determined by whites. White discourse drapes over blacks an intricate veil of images and understandings--assertions of inferiority; metaphors of exoticism; similes of animals; tropes of fertility, nothingness, and death--through which whites read race and beneath which blacks remain imprisoned. "Words," Nielsen writes, "create and maintain relationships of power as surely as do prisons and arms." Speaking of the discourse of race in America, Nielsen identifies "dead metaphors"--words, images, ideas--that operate in much the same way as the "charged detail" of Pound or the "objective correlative" of T.S. Eliot. Embedded in the language, they are instantly recognizable to the native speaker. Poets, when they draw upon these metaphors, demand racist thinking in order to be understood.


Poetics Of Emergence

Poetics of Emergence PDF
Author: Benjamin Lee
Publisher: Contemp North American Poetry
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 190
View: 695

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Book Description:
Experimental poetry responded to historical change in the decades after World War II, with an attitude of such casual and reckless originality that its insights have often been overlooked. However, as Benjamin Lee argues, to ignore the scenes of self and the historical occasions captured by experimental poets during the 1950s and 1960s is to overlook a rich and instructive resource for our own complicated transition into the twenty-first century. Frank O'Hara and fellow experimental poets like Amiri Baraka, Diane di Prima, and Allen Ginsberg offer us a set of perceptive responses to Cold War culture, lyric meditations on consequential changes in U.S. social life and politics, including the decline of the Old Left, the rise of white-collar workers, and the emergence of vernacular practices like hipsterism and camp. At the same time, they offer us opportunities to anatomize our own desire for historical significance and belonging, a desire we may well see reflected and reconfigured in the work of these poets.


Choice

Choice PDF
Author:
Publisher:
Category : Academic libraries
Languages : en
Pages :
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African American Literature

African American Literature PDF
Author: Paul Q. Tilden
Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated
Category : Literary Collections
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 2545

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Book Description:
Having its origins in the slave narratives and the folktales transmitted orally during that period, the literature of the African American has been rich and varied. Beginning with the first published work of fiction (Clotel; Or, the President's Daughter) in 1853, continuing under the influence of W.E.B. Du Bois during the first part of this century, and reaching a flowering during the Harlem Renaissance, major contributions have been made to American literature. Today African American writers, such as Toni Morrison, Alex Haley, and Maya Angelou are recognized as among the most significant and popular authors in this country. This new book presents an important overview of African-American literature as well as a comprehensive bibliography with easy access provided by title, subject, and author indexes.


Everybody S Autonomy

Everybody s Autonomy PDF
Author: Juliana Spahr
Publisher: University Alabama Press
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 224
View: 1451

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Book Description:
Experimental texts empower the reader by encouraging self-governing approaches to reading and by placing the reader on equal footing with the author. Everybody's Autonomy is about reading and identity. Contemporary avant garde writing has often been overlooked by those who study literature and identity. Such writing has been perceived as unrelated, as disrespectful of subjectivity. But Everybody's Autonomy instead locates within avant garde literature models of identity that are communal, connective, and racially concerned. Everybody's Autonomy, as it tackles literary criticism's central question of what sort of selves do works create, looks at works that encourage connection, works that present and engage with large, public worlds that are in turn shared with readers. With this intent, it aligns the iconoclastic work of Gertrude Stein with foreign, immigrant Englishes and their accompanying subjectivities. It examines the critique of white individualism and privilege in the work of language writers Lyn Hejinian and Bruce Andrews. It looks at how Harryette Mullen mixes language writing's open text with the distinctivesness of African-American culture to propose a communal, yet still racially conscious identity. And it examines Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's use of broken English and French to unsettle readers' fluencies and assimilating comprehensions, to decolonize reading. Such works, the book argues, well represent and expand changing notions of the public, of everybody.