The Good Years

The Good Years PDF
Author: Walter Lord
Publisher: Open Road Media
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 368
View: 1573

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Book Description:
This New York Times bestseller by the author of A Night to Remember explores America in the years between the Gilded Age and the beginning of the Great War. Though remarkable in their own right, the first fifteen years of the 1900s had the misfortune of being sandwiched between—and overshadowed by—the Gilded Age and the First World War. In The Good Years, Walter Lord remedies this neglect, bringing to vivid life the events of 1900 to 1914, when industrialization made staggering advances, and the Wright brothers captured the world’s imagination. Lord writes of Newport and Fifth Avenue, where the rich lived gaily and without much worry beyond the occasional economic panic. He also delves into the sweatshops of the second industrial revolution, where impoverished laborers and children suffered under unimaginable conditions. From the assassination of President McKinley to the hot and lazy “last summer” before the outbreak of war, Lord writes with insight and humor about the uniquely American energy and enthusiasm of those years before the Great War would forever change the world. From the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Incredible Victory and Day of Infamy, this is an “informative and entertaining” journey through an often-overlooked period of history at the beginning of the twentieth century (The New York Times).


The Good Years

The Good Years PDF
Author: Harold D. Lasswell
Publisher: Routledge
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 384
View: 7548

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Book Description:
The period between 1900 and the First World War could be called the Confident Years, the Buoyant Years, the Spirited Years, or named after some bright, hopeful color, like the Golden Years. It could be done, but such tags are the invention of pundits, social historians, and professional name coiners. To the many varied people who lived through the era--the men and women who wistfully recall marching for suffrage, rebuilding San Francisco, or cheering wildly for Woodrow Wilson--the age was remembered as the Good Years. It was a time of triumph (the Wright brothers) and of tragedy (the Titanic). Days of wealth (a $200,000 ball) and of poverty (a child in a cotton mill earning $3.54 a week). But through it all ran an exciting thread of boundless confidence and hope. No one ever accused the people of that period of national indifference. It is this spirit of uncontested optimism, along with the pageant of great events, that makes this book such rewarding reading. In gathering his material, Walter Lord pored over letters, diaries, unpublished reminiscences, even Pinkerton reports, filled with fascinating and, until now, unknown detail. He traveled thousands of miles and interviewed the people who lived through the period. He met with individuals who firmly believed they had been given the greatest experience anyone could ever have; they knew and enjoyed the years when there was no limit to what we could and would do. Lord's attention to first-hand sources makes this book vivid and timeless. And Leslie Lenkowsky's new introduction adds contemporary dimension to this classic work.


The Good Years From 1900 To The First World War

The Good Years  from 1900 to the First World War PDF
Author: Walter Lord
Publisher: New York : Harper
Category : United States
Languages : en
Pages : 369
View: 5855

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Book Description:
This is about the years from the turn of the century to the First World War, when for a span of time that was never going to end Americans enjoyed the best of all possible worlds.


American Pop

American Pop PDF
Author: Bob Batchelor
Publisher: Greenwood
Category : Electronic books
Languages : en
Pages : 440
View: 5734

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Book Description:
Chronicles the history of popular culture in America from 1900 through 1929, and discusses advertising, architecture, print media, entertainment, fashion, food, music, sports, art, and more; and includes time line for each decade.


Literature Of The 1950s

Literature of the 1950s PDF
Author: Alice Ferrebe
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 1822

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Book Description:
This lively study challenges the myths about apathy and smugness surrounding British literature of the period. It rereads the decade and its literature as crucial in twentieth-century British history for its emergent and increasingly complicated politics


From Missouri

From Missouri PDF
Author: Thad Snow
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 352
View: 1905

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Book Description:
After years of subjecting the editors of St. Louis newspapers to eloquent letters on subjects as diverse as floods, tariffs, and mules, Thad Snow published his memoir From Missouri in his mid-seventies in 1954. He was barely retired from farming for more than half a century, mostly in the Missouri Bootheel, or “Swampeast Missouri,” as he called it. Now back in print with a new introduction by historian Bonnie Stepenoff, these sketches of a life, a region, and an era will delight readers new to this distinctive American voice as well as readers already familiar with this masterpiece of the American Midwest. Snow purchased a thousand acres of southeast Missouri swampland in 1910, cleared it, drained it, and eventually planted it in cotton. Although he employed sharecroppers, he grew to become a bitter critic of the labor system after a massive flood and the Great Depression worsened conditions for these already-burdened workers. Shocking his fellow landowners, Snow invited the Southern Tenant Farmers Union to organize the workers on his land. He was even once accused of fomenting a strike and publicly threatened with horsewhipping. Snow’s admiration for Owen Whitfield, the African American leader of the Sharecroppers’ Roadside Demonstration, convinced him that nonviolent resistance could defeat injustice. Snow embraced pacifism wholeheartedly and denounced all war as evil even as America mobilized for World War II after the attack on Pearl Harbor. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, he became involved with creating Missouri’s conservation movement. Near the end of his life, he found a retreat in the Missouri Ozarks, where he wrote this recollection of his life. This unique and honest series of personal essays expresses the thoughts of a farmer, a hunter, a husband, a father and grandfather, a man with a soft spot for mules and dogs and all kinds of people. Snow’s prose reveals much about a way of life in the region during the first half of the twentieth century, as well as the social and political events that affected the entire nation. Whether arguing that a good stock dog should be left alone to do its work, explaining the process of making swampland suitable for agriculture, or putting forth his case for world peace, Snow’s ideas have a special authenticity because they did not come from an ivory tower or a think tank—they came From Missouri.


The Decline Of Laissez Faire 1897 1917

The Decline of Laissez Faire  1897 1917 PDF
Author: Harold Underwood Faulkner
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 433
View: 3988

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Book Description:
Part of a series of detailed reference manuals on American economic history, this volume traces the development and growth of the factory system, labour movements and foreign and domestic commerce.


Henry Ford

Henry Ford PDF
Author: Vincent Curcio
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 336
View: 3285

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Book Description:
Most great figures in American history reveal great contradictions, and Henry Ford is no exception. He championed his workers, offering unprecedented wages, yet crushed their attempts to organize. Virulently anti-Semitic, he never employed fewer than 3,000 Jews. An outspoken pacifist, he made millions producing war materials. He urbanized the modern world, and then tried to drag it back into a romanticized rural past he'd helped to destroy. As the American auto industry struggles to reinvent itself, Vincent Curcio's timely biography offers a wealth of new insight into the man who started it all. Henry Ford not only founded Ford Motor Company but institutionalized assembly line production and, some would argue, created the American middle class. By constantly improving his product and increasing sales, Ford was able to lower the price of the automobile until it became a universal commodity. He paid his workers so well that, for the first time in history, the people who manufactured a complex industrial product could own one. This was "Fordism"--social engineering on a vast scale. But, as Curcio displays, Ford's anti-Semitism would forever stain his reputation. Hitler admired him greatly, both for his anti-Semitism and his autocratic leadership, displaying Ford's picture in his bedroom and keeping a copy of Ford's My Life and Work by his bedside. Nevertheless, Ford's economic and social initiatives, as well as his deft handling of his public image, kept his popularity high among Americans. He offered good pay, good benefits, English language classes, and employment for those who struggled to find jobs--handicapped, African-American, and female workers. Such was his popularity that in 1923, the homespun, clean-living, xenophobic Henry Ford nearly won the Republican presidential nomination. This new volume in the Lives and Legacies series explores the full impact of Ford's indisputable greatness, the deep flaws that complicate his legacy, and what he means for our own time.